С-Петербург, улица Тосина 3
+7 (812) 917-84-85
+7 (921) 316-27-00

2018 subaru wrx


2018 Subaru WRX Review, Ratings, Specs, Prices, and Photos

The Subaru WRX’s hallmark always has been, frankly, hauling ass.

The turbocharged flat-4 mated to all-wheel drive and a 6-speed manual or continuously variable transmission (CVT) can hustle around corners and sideways around dirt roads better than nearly anything else we’ve driven. It’s an easy 9 out of 10 for performance. The WRX STI isn’t much quicker, but it’s sharper and trades some of the comfort for hard-edged performance that we appreciate—but we’re not sure we’d want to live with every day, we cover it below. (Read more about how we rate cars.)

The perky 2.0-liter turbo-4 lays its cylinders flat for lower weight distribution and Subaru’s signature sound. Fire it to life and the boxer engine turns gas into 268 horsepower and 258 pound feet of torque on a wide power plateau between 2,000 and 5,200 rpm. Thank the turbochargers, which along with different cams and valve springs, bring life to the relatively limp Impreza family.

A 6-speed manual is standard on all Impreza models, and if it weren’t for better safety gear in the CVT-equipped model, it would be our unanimous pick in the sedan. The shifter clicks through all six gears with relatively short throws and the reliable clutch take-up lets our toes tap around the footwell with confidence. Subaru says the manual can speed the WRX up to 60 mph in 5.4 seconds.

The CVT is a remarkably good one, if you’re into that sort of thing. WRX Premium and WRX Limited trim levels offer customizable drive modes—Intelligent, Sport, and Sport Sharp—that transform the transmission’s behavior. In Intelligent, the CVT works similarly to every other pulley-and-belt system to keep the WRX efficient and mostly quiet. Dial the WRX into Sport and the transmission offers six paddle-shifted steps to simulate gears that sound and act like the real thing.

Dial it into Sport Sharp and the WRX acts better like a dual-clutch automatic with eight selectable ratios that click through quickly. Subaru estimates that when pressed, the CVT does the 0-to-60-mph hustle in 5.9 seconds.

The all-wheel-drive systems operate differently depending on transmission. The manual gets a standard 50/50-split mechanical all-wheel-drive system with viscous coupling center differential that moves power around based on available traction. The CVT version offers a 45/55-split electronically controlled version with a planetary gearset center differential that monitors driving conditions to move power around.

The WRX is tuned for performance driving with stiff springs and stout antiroll bars that make any commute entertaining—even when we’re not in a laughing mood. The electric power steering is tuned well and offers sharp and precise cuts through traffic or in curvy roads. We’ve noticed some issues with repeated, hard braking, so performance pads could be on the short list for any spirited buyer.

WRX STI

The WRX STI uses a different engine than the WRX and is available only with a manual transmission. The 2.5-liter turbo-4 makes 305 hp and 290 lb-ft, but the power difference between the WRX and WRX STI is less than one might imagine.

The STI focuses first on handling and suspension, highlighted by its driver-controlled rear differential that dials in more or less slip from the Torsen rear differential via three programmed settings or six individual steps.

The suspension is stiffer with inverted front struts and aluminum A-arms for sharper damping. Subaru has upgraded the brakes this year with six-piston front stoppers (vs. four-piston last year) and bigger, cross-drilled rotors for better cooling.

The STI still uses a hydraulic rack for steering, which provides better road feel—the heavier steering and manual transmission-only STI could reasonably replace arm and leg day with a spirited drive.

Around the streets and in twisty mountain roads, the 2018 Subaru WRX STI is alive with the same verve and appeal that it’s had since its arrival almost two decades ago.

Bigger brakes are noticeable with plenty of power when the stoppers are pressed into service—bordering on grabby.

The STI sports summer tires as standard equipment, which should serve as notice: all-wheel drive is meant to serve as a performance bonus, not hold court as a trail-ready climber.

Review continues below

www.thecarconnection.com

2018 Subaru WRX and WRX STI pair updated looks with performance upgrades

MSRP: $27,195 MSRP: $32,420 MSRP: $28,895 2019 Honda Pilot Drivers' Notes 13 cars you can legally import in 2019 2020 BMW 4 Series convertible spy shots Autoblog's top photographs of 2018 Watch Tesla Model 3 get built First 2019 Hyundai Nexo FCEV delivered 1 2

Follow Us

From Our Partners

!function(f, b, e, v, n, t, s) { if (f.fbq) return; n = f.fbq = function() {n.callMethod ? n.callMethod.apply(n, arguments) : n.queue.push(arguments)}; if (!f._fbq) f._fbq = n; n.push = n; n.loaded = !0; n.version = '2.0'; n.queue = []; t = b.createElement(e); t.async = !0; t.src = v; s = b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(t, s)}(window, document, 'script', '//connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js'); fbq('init', '174181139752304'); fbq('track', 'PageView'); fbq('trackCustom', 'ViewedVehicle', {year: '', make: 'Subaru', model: 'WRX', trim: ''});>

(function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){(i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o), m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m)})(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga'); ga('create', 'UA-71479133-1', 'auto'); ga('set', 'anonymizeIp', true); ga('set', 'dimension2', 'Subaru'); ga('set', 'dimension3', 'WRX'); ga('set', 'dimension4', '2018 Subaru WRX and WRX STI pair updated looks with performance upgrades'); ga('set', 'dimension5', 'Detroit_Auto_Show|Subaru|Sedan|Performance|2017_detroit_auto_show|2018_subaru_wrx|2018_subaru_wrx_sti|official|subaru_wrx|subaru_wrx_sti|@roundup-detroit2017|@autoblog-original'); ga('set', 'dimension7', 'content'); ga('set', 'dimension8', 'story'); ga('send', 'pageview');>

(function(d, t) {var a = d.createElement(t), s = d.getElementsByTagName(t)[0]; a.src = 'https://o.aolcdn.com/ads/adsWrapper.js'; s.parentNode.insertBefore(a, s);}(document, 'script'));>

(function(d, t) {var a = d.createElement(t), s = d.getElementsByTagName(t)[0]; a.src = 'https://cdn.flipboard.com/web/buttons/js/flbuttons.min.js'; s.parentNode.insertBefore(a, s);}(document, 'script'));>

$.getScript('https://www.zergnet.com/zerg.js?id=21232');$.getScript('https://www.zergnet.com/zerg.js?id=47172');>

$.ajaxSetup({ cache: true });$.getScript('https://cdn.mediavoice.com/nativeads/script/aolibrands/autoblog_article.js');$.ajaxSetup({ cache: false });>

www.autoblog.com

2018 Subaru WRX Information

The Subaru WRX is a high-performance version of the Impreza compact sedan, made so with substantial engineering changes, not just bolt-on parts. The engine is more powerful, the chassis is stiffened, and it has its own all-wheel-drive system. Unlike the Impreza, the WRX is not available as a popular five-door hatchback. For 2018, the WRX gets bigger air intakes in front, and painted brake calipers.

There is also a WRX STI model, that goes even farther, and makes fewer compromises for civility on the road. It has more features in the cabin, but the suspension is sharper and stiffer. It's a bit faster, with an engine that is bigger and more powerful.

Neither the WRX nor STI are known for refinement, comfort, or convenience. Road noise is high. They are considered five-seaters, but only two people will be comfortable in the rear because the middle seat is slim and hard. The rear seat folds down for more cargo space, but the Impreza Sport or Crosstrek are better able to carry sports equipment.

Yet it was the Subaru Impreza WRX, along with the Mitsubishi Lancer Evo, that captured the imagination of enthusiasts through rallying, with performance coming from small but powerful engines, well-designed suspensions, and four-wheel drive. No one does this better than Subaru and the WRX makes the point. WRX, after all, is intended to stand for World Rally Championship.

The WRX uses a turbocharged direct-injection 2.0-liter boxer four-cylinder engine with a twin-scroll turbocharger, making 268 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque that comes at 2000 rpm and lasts until 5200 rpm. It's mated to either a 6-speed manual gearbox or a continuously variable transmission (CVT). The 6-speed manual uses all-wheel drive with viscous coupling at the center differential that splits power 50/50 front to rear, and is variable from side to side.

The Subaru CVT is as sharp as any we've tested, thanks to its design and programming. It has eight steps that make it feel like a sequential automatic transmission in Sport Sharp mode, or six steps in Sport mode; it behaves more like a CVT in Intelligent mode. Its all-wheel-drive splits power 45/55 front/rear, and moves it from side to side depending on traction needs. Additionally, the torque moves around between wheels based on cornering forces and steering-wheel inputs. There's electric power steering, and naturally the suspension is sport tuned.

The WRX STI gets chassis bracing, a stiffer suspension with revised front geometry, 305-horsepower engine, its own 6-speed manual gearbox, bigger brakes, quick-ratio hydraulic-boost steering, and an edgy all-wheel-drive system that's better for the track.

With the standard transmission, the WRX gets an EPA-rated 20/27/23 mpg City/Highway/Combined; it's 2 mpg less with the CVT, which is unusual because CVTs are all about fuel mileage. However, Subaru says in Intelligent mode the CVT delivers nearly 24 mpg Combined.

The STI is rated at 17/23/19 mpg.

The NHTSA hasn't tested the WRX, but the IIHS give it its Top Safety Pick Plus rating, with the best scores across the … Full Review

The Subaru WRX is a high-performance version of the Impreza compact sedan, made so with substantial engineering changes, not just bolt-on parts. The engine is more powerful, the chassis is stiffened, and it has its own all-wheel-drive system. Unlike the Impreza, the WRX is not available as a popular five-door hatchback. For 2018, the WRX gets bigger air intakes in front, and painted brake calipers.

There is also a WRX STI model, that goes even farther, and makes fewer compromises for civility on the road. It has more features in the cabin, but the suspension is sharper and stiffer. It's a bit faster, with an engine that is bigger and more powerful.

Neither the WRX nor STI are known for refinement, comfort, or convenience. Road noise is high. They are considered five-seaters, but only two people will be comfortable in the rear because the middle seat is slim and hard. The rear seat folds down for more cargo space, but the Impreza Sport or Crosstrek are better able to carry sports equipment.

Yet it was the Subaru Impreza WRX, along with the Mitsubishi Lancer Evo, that captured the imagination of enthusiasts through rallying, with performance coming from small but powerful engines, well-designed suspensions, and four-wheel drive. No one does this better than Subaru and the WRX makes the point. WRX, after all, is intended to stand for World Rally Championship.

The WRX uses a turbocharged direct-injection 2.0-liter boxer four-cylinder engine with a twin-scroll turbocharger, making 268 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque that comes at 2000 rpm and lasts until 5200 rpm. It's mated to either a 6-speed manual gearbox or a continuously variable transmission (CVT). The 6-speed manual uses all-wheel drive with viscous coupling at the center differential that splits power 50/50 front to rear, and is variable from side to side.

The Subaru CVT is as sharp as any we've tested, thanks to its design and programming. It has eight steps that make it feel like a sequential automatic transmission in Sport Sharp mode, or six steps in Sport mode; it behaves more like a CVT in Intelligent mode. Its all-wheel-drive splits power 45/55 front/rear, and moves it from side to side depending on traction needs. Additionally, the torque moves around between wheels based on cornering forces and steering-wheel inputs. There's electric power steering, and naturally the suspension is sport tuned.

The WRX STI gets chassis bracing, a stiffer suspension with revised front geometry, 305-horsepower engine, its own 6-speed manual gearbox, bigger brakes, quick-ratio hydraulic-boost steering, and an edgy all-wheel-drive system that's better for the track.

With the standard transmission, the WRX gets an EPA-rated 20/27/23 mpg City/Highway/Combined; it's 2 mpg less with the CVT, which is unusual because CVTs are all about fuel mileage. However, Subaru says in Intelligent mode the CVT delivers nearly 24 mpg Combined.

The STI is rated at 17/23/19 mpg.

The NHTSA hasn't tested the WRX, but the IIHS give it its Top Safety Pick Plus rating, with the best scores across the … Hide Full Review

www.autoblog.com


Смотрите также

 

"Питер - АТ"
ИНН 780703320484
ОГРНИП 313784720500453

Новости